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Floundering NRA Struggles to Maintain Its 2016 Influence in 2020 Race

Politics KTLA

The National Rifle Association was already reeling from leadership shakeups and allegations of financial mismanagement when it dropped another bombshell. The NRA accused Chris Cox — the man who had controlled the organization’s lobbying and
'The National Rifle Association was already reeling from  leadership shakeups  and allegations of financial mismanagement when it dropped another bombshell. The NRA accused Chris Cox — the man who had controlled the organization’s lobbying and political activities for more than 15 years — of  trying to overthrow  Chief Executive Wayne LaPierre, according to a lawsuit filed last month. Thoughts and prayers. https://t.co/lp13hJH8E4 — Gavin Newsom (@GavinNewsom) July 20, 2019 Cox denied the charge to The New York Times, but quickly resigned. His unceremonious sacking stunned NRA board members, who saw Cox as a potential successor to LaPierre, and infuriated political staffers. Some started packing up their desks, unsure of whether they would be ousted too, multiple NRA sources said. That’s when the Washington power brokers really started to worry. Cox’s departure, after months of turmoil at the NRA, only amplified the sense that the gun-rights group might not be the political powerhouse in 2020 that it has been for decades, including notably in 2016. When President Donald Trump convened a meeting with bipartisan lawmakers and signaled and openness to some gun control measures in the wake of a shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 dead, it was Cox who showed up at the White House the following evening. Afterward, Cox tweeted that Trump didn’t want gun control. For his part, Trump tweeted: “Good (Great) meeting in the Oval Office tonight with the NRA!” The reservoir of goodwill toward Cox ran deep on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue. “Every Republican senator who matters has Chris’ cell phone number,” one GOP operative who worked closely with Cox on the political side told CNN. “And vice versa.” The operative recounted one meeting between Cox and a senator, ostensibly about a policy issue, that instead was focused primarily on the senator’s favorite hunting grounds in his home state. Cox knew them all in advance — and had been to them himself. Cox and his team held weekly calls with Republican committees to share tips about ongoing campaigns — calls that increased in frequency in the lead-up to key primaries and Election Day, according to former officials. “Senators didn’t call Wayne,” the GOP operative said of LaPierre. “They called Chris.” That’s partly because it was Cox’s job to maintain those contacts, while LaPierre oversaw the organization. Cox has moved on to launch his own Washington consulting firm. But unease over his departure — and LaPierre’s efforts to consolidate power — is fueling uncertainty about the direction of the organization overall. An alleged coup-gone-wrong The NRA’s dysfunction exploded into a public spectacle at the group’s annual meeting April in Indianapolis. That’s where LaPierre accused then-NRA President Oliver North of trying to extort him. North had allegedly demanded that LaPierre step down as CEO and continue to support North as NRA president — “or be smeared,” according to LaPierre’s letter to the board and court filings. North had one more demand: Drop a pending lawsuit against Ackerman McQueen. Weeks earlier, the NRA had sued Ackerman, its longtime advertising partner, claiming the firm was refusing to hand over documentation of its expenses. For nearly 40 years, Ackerman had crafted the NRA’s marketing strategy, planned and placed media, “including advertising during election cycles,” and operated the controversial NRATV, according to court filings. Over the years, Ackerman hired personnel to work on the NRA’s account, like NRA spokesperson Dana Loesch. “The NRA and Ackerman have collaborated fruitfully for decades. Together, the parties crafted iconic, impactful Second Amendment messaging that featured Charlton Heston … and other important constitutional rights advocates,” the NRA wrote in its lawsuit. “However, the NRA’s patience has run out.” Ackerman was also paying North. Instead of acquiescing to North’s demands, LaPierre told the board he was the victim of an attempted coup. LaPierre kept his perch as CEO. North was effectively ousted as president. “The NRA does not take kindly to threats — and neither did LaPierre,” the NRA wrote in a court filing. North, in a court filing, denied that he was involved in a plot to overthrow LaPierre. Embarrassing revelations started spilling out in court filings and in a cache of letters and invoices anonymously posted online and substantiated by sources familiar with them. On top of the $40 million annually that the NRA was allegedly shelling out to Ackerman (a sum Ackerman disputes), other questionable expenses came to light. “We realized during these discussions that we need to address your wardrobe you required us to provide, specifically, purchases at the Zegna store in Beverly Hills, CA,” one of the letters from Ackerman McQueen to LaPierre that was posted online stated. It cited nearly $275,000 in purchases from the high-end Italian clothier. Members were paying attention. “I’m not sure why Wayne needs somebody to buy his clothes for him, he makes a very nice salary,” said Dan Zimmerman, managing editor of The Truth About Guns website and a member of the NRA. LaPierre earned more than $1.4 million from the NRA and related organizations in 2017, according to the non-profit’s latest filing with the IRS. In a new court filing Thursday, North said he wanted outside professionals look into potential financial mismanagement within the NRA. Instead, LaPierre retaliated by having North removed from his role as president and board member, North alleges in the filing. “LaPierre — demonstrating his total dictatorial control over the NRA … stopped all of North’s inquiries and prevented others at the NRA from looking into the concerns that North raised,” according to the court filing from North’s legal team. The NRA defended LaPierre’s spending in court filings, noting that the clothing purchases were for filming commercials and other business-related activities. “Of course, AMc should not have incurred (let alone sought reimbursement for) any expenses which it believed inappropriate,” the NRA shot back. Letters from Ackerman McQueen also pointed to more than $240,000 LaPierre had billed to the advertising agency for trips to destinations including Italy, Hungary and the Bahamas. A letter also questioned why LaPierre had required Ackerman McQueen to pick up a nearly $14,000 tab to rent an apartment for a summer intern. The NRA said the trips were business related and had been vetted by the finance and audit committees. It said the apartment was provided to the intern because the customary intern housing through a local university was unavailable. All of these expenses came on top of a sharp decline in revenue in 2017. An NRA source said those numbers improved in 2018, but did not provide details. The biggest expense at issue, though, were legal fees. In a letter that was posted online, North wrote to top NRA officials to express his concern that the organization had paid Brewer Attorneys & Counselors $24 million over the past 13 months. “The Brewer invoices are draining NRA cash at mindboggling speed,” North wrote. He requested an outside, independent review of the legal fees. The NRA threw its support behind the Brewer law firm. Charles L. Cotton, the chairman of the NRA’s Audit Committee, wrote in a statement that North’s memo “reflects a misinformed view of the firm, its billings, and its advocacy for the NRA.” It is clear the NRA has legal problems: It is suing Ackerman McQueen, it is suing Oliver North and it is under investigation by Congress. New York Attorney General Letitia James is  probing the NRA’s finances , which could put the NRA’s nonprofit status in jeopardy. Plus, the NRA is fighting a separate legal battle in New York after the governor cracked down on banks and insurers doing business with the NRA — a response to the NRA-backed “Carry Guard” liability insurance program for gun owners. “The NRA is under siege by Cuomo and the New York State A.G., who are illegally using the State’s legal apparatus to take down and destroy this very important organization, & others,” Trump tweeted in April. “It must get its act together quickly, stop the internal fighting, & get back to GREATNESS – FAST!” Meanwhile all of this news has delighted the NRA’s critics. “It’s like watching a five-alarm fire, but what’s amazing about this is the NRA itself lit the match,” said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety. Democrats take aim at the NRA The NRA is up against a different political landscape in 2020 than the one it faced four years ago. Democratic presidential hopefuls took to the debate stage openly talking about banning assault weapons, instituting universal background checks and taking on the NRA. They are emboldened, in part, by public sentiment. In May 2019, 61% of voters said they supporter stricter gun laws, compared to 34% who opposed them,  according to a Quinnipiac University poll . But Democrats have also been bolstered by gun control groups that are emerging as more formidable opponents to the gun rights movement. In the 2018 midterms, gun control groups actually outspent the NRA. “Gun safety is going to be a defining issue for 2020,” Feinblatt said. “The gun safety movement has never been stronger and the gun rights movement has never been weaker.” For its part, the NRA is more than happy to be underestimated. “We are very focused on 2020,” said NRA spokesman Andrew Arulanandam. “Our members know what’s at stake from draconian gun control schemes, from gun confiscation to registration, so they will be out in force and the NRA will make sure of it.” “Disillusioned and disgruntled” members Ideally, though, an internal war at the nation’s preeminent gun rights group wouldn’t be spilling into public view in the run-up to a presidential election. “To the extent that these controversies combined with a huge drain on the organization’s resources and time distract it, that’s a negative for gun rights in the United States,” said Zimmerman, the gun website editor. Last month, the NRA and Ackerman officially severed ties amid their bitter court battle. NRATV, an Ackerman production,  was among the casualties . The streaming programming was divisive, expensive and little-watched, according to  viewer data obtained by The New York Times . In an episode needling the diversity among the talking trains in children’s show “Thomas & Friends,” NRATV portrayed the trains in Ku Klux Klan hoods. Hosts have lamented that “men are getting less masculine” and that immigrant detention centers “if anything, are too nice.” The NRA has no plans to revive the programming. It noted in one court filing that “certain NRA stakeholders were also concerned that NRATV’s messaging — on topics far afield of the Second Amendment — deviated from the NRA’s core mission and values.” A source familiar with the situation said the NRA also has no plans to bring Dana Loesch, NRATV’s frontwoman, back into the NRA fold. That may not be enough to satisfy some NRA members, who believe the NRA has embraced the conservative movement so fully that it has driven away any non-Republican gun owners. “Many of us feel they stopped being a lobbying organization and started being a lifestyle brand,” said Rob Pincus, who described himself as a “disillusioned and disgruntled” lifetime member of the NRA. “You’ve got a lot of angry and concerned American gun owners who are demanding change.” Some board members, including former Florida congressman Allen West, publicly called for a change in leadership. At least one donor  told The New York Times on the record  that he was interested in leading a rebellion. Other grassroots members are trying to encourage their fellow Second Amendment advocates to quit paying dues to the NRA and redirect their money and their time to other gun rights groups. “I just simply do not understand the people who seem to think Wayne LaPierre is the NRA,” said Jeff Knox, a lifetime NRA member. “The NRA is not the gun lobby. We are. We the people, we the members. We’re the source of the power, we’re the source of their money, we’re the source of their influence.” Strength in numbers On at least that point, everyone agrees. Lawmakers, NRA leadership and grassroots Second Amendment supporters all say the NRA derives its power from its membership roll. “You all think it’s about cutting checks — and don’t get me wrong, they do,” one national GOP official said of the media perception of the NRA’s strength. “But it’s the membership that scares congressman and senators. You get on the wrong side of that and you’re f—–.” A well-functioning NRA can direct a large, motivated membership to support its chosen candidates and causes, delivering at the polls but also pressuring lawmakers when gun issues come up legislatively. “It goes well beyond saying ‘hey, go vote for this candidate,'” a Republican senator who worked with Cox told CNN. “They do persuasion work, they do get-out-the-vote work, hell they’ll tell their folks how, where and when to vote in primaries, which has been a tremendous help for some of us.” The fear of angering those members still stands. Lawmakers and other GOP officials interviewed for this story were almost universally reluctant to go on the record out of concern of running afoul of the organization and its allies. So long as the family feud continues, “it’s better to publicly stay out of it,” the senator said. Privately is a different story, however. Republicans and both chambers have raised concerns to their respective campaign arms as the election cycle has started to kick into gear. Even in disarray — even when some subset of the members is furious with the NRA’s management — it doesn’t mean those members are likely to turn around and vote for whoever emerges at the Democratic nominee. The Trump reelection campaign, meanwhile, is far from the flung-together apparatus of 2016. In the second quarter of 2019, the Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee raised a combined $108 million. A Trump campaign source noted that the campaign won’t need to rely on the NRA’s war chest the way it did in 2016. That year the NRA spent more than $30 million backing Trump, more than it spent on all of its races combined — presidential, House and Senate — in the 2008 and 2012 elections,  according to the Center for Responsive Politics . The NRA source said the group would spend “whatever is needed” to win in 2020, despite its other financial challenges. “At an absolute worst-case scenario, all this means is the NRA can’t spend money like they did last time,” said Knox, one of the lifetime members. “I don’t think it’s the tragedy that the Democrats are hoping for.”'

Gifts, goads and grace | In the Spirit

Retail Santa Cruz Sentinel

I went shopping for a new swimsuit a few days ago — one of my most unfavorite things to do. There may be a woman somewhere who actually likes shopping for swimsuits, but so far I have never met her. It was a particularly hot day for our foggy
'I went shopping for a new swimsuit a few days ago — one of my most unfavorite things to do. There may be a woman somewhere who actually likes shopping for swimsuits, but so far I have never met her. It was a particularly hot day for our foggy climes, which made finding a swimsuit more desperate and more difficult. After an hour of sweating it out with spandex squishing recalcitrant flesh, I left the store without a swimsuit —  exhausted, defeated and demoralized. Approaching my car, I discovered a family sitting on a nearby swatch of grass eating vanilla ice cream cones, dipped in chocolate, with nuts on top. “Those look delicious,” I exclaimed, “did you get them over there?” Nods all around. “That’s where I’m going next,” I said, opening my car door. I dumped my shopping bag without-a-swimsuit, turned around and at my side stood the littlest girl holding out a box with two remaining ice cream cones. I took one with enthusiastic, heartfelt thanks, sat down and immediately unwrapped it. We were all munching merrily, grinning at each other, when Papa drove into the parking space right next to my car. He loaded in the families purchases and took the last ice cream cone. Everyone piled into the car, waving good-by as I thanked them again. It made my day — “a cup of cold water given to the least of these,” which in that moment was me. (Note: Please do not write me about correlations between ice cream cones and recalcitrant flesh.) Gifts or Goads We can so deeply bless each other with small generous offers. We can also hurt each other, often without any intention of doing so. In light of this, the intent to hurt someone looms as utterly reprehensible. I remember once saying to my squabbling children in the backseat of the car, “there’s plenty of pain and suffering in the world without you adding to it.” In our public lives, personal attacks seem to have become the way of doing business. A particular action or phrase is latched onto and paraded around with sweeping negative assumptions about an individual’s motivations, morality and ideology. It doesn’t matter if the phrase or action happened yesterday or ten years ago, the point is to tear down the individual and build up a negative picture. No time is given for exploration, explanation, or personal communication before a new attack is launched. Was there once a community where people talked with each other about problems and solutions, offering an assortment of possible ideas instead of just attacking from afar? Why are we tearing down instead of building up? On Realm We have new software for our church called Realm. Used by many denominations — Roman Catholic, Orthodox, Methodist, Baptist —  Realm has a database for tracking members, finances, etc. However, Realm has the additional possibility of forming Social Media type groups within the Church’s membership. A friend and I just started ‘Books on Realm,’ a place where members can post about books that impacted them. We can comment on each other’s posts and message each other within Realm’s walls. See acstechnologies.com/products/realm . The most recent post in our Books on Realm group, is about a book by columnist Arthur C. Brooks, “Love Your Enemies; How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt.” Unlike Facebook or Goodreads, discussions on Realm happen within a small, physical community. You are likely to bump into these people every week or so. Ideas can be further discussed face to face, and books are easily passed around. I now have “Love Your Enemies” in my hot little hands; maybe I’ll buy a box of ice cream cones to go with it. ENDQUOTE: “I suppose that since most of our hurts come through relationships so will our healing, and I know that grace rarely makes sense for those looking in from the outside.” ― Wm. Paul Young, “The Shack”'

Comic-Con 2019: ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ stars say recent earthquakes have them rethinking survival skills

Culture and Entertainment San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Stars from the hit AMC show discussed at Comic-Con what they'd need to survive a real-life natural disaster.
'Just hours after being told that the show had been renewed for a sixth season , cast members of AMC’s “Fear the Walking Dead” hit the press room at Comic-Con International in San Diego on Friday with big smiles. The spin-off of wildly popular zombie-filled drama, “The Walking Dead,” has become a stand-alone sensation. It even has experienced successful crossovers with both Morgan Jones (played by Lennie James) and Dwight (Austin Amelio) making the jump from the mother ship and fitting in just right with the rest of the cast on “Fear the Walking Dead.” The show itself is about survival and during the conference the cast members said that the recent 6.4 and 7.1-magnitude earthquakes that shook Ridgecrest earlier this month had them rethinking some of their own real-life disaster survival skills. The cast #FearTWD #TheWalkingDead #SDCC #HallH pic.twitter.com/vJ6GNz0hld — Undead Walking (@UndeadWalkingFS) July 19, 2019 “If you live in California, you have to be prepared,” Rubén Blades, who plays Daniel Salazar, said, adding that if disaster were to strike, all he’d really need is “9,000 cans of pork and beans and 300,000 rolls of toilet paper.” Related Articles \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: George Takei draws from personal experiences in Japanese internment camps for ‘The Terror: Infamy’\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: Senator Cory Booker walks convention floor, hangs out with ‘Star Trek’ fans\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: That dancing horror creature wandering the floor hopes to be a monster hit\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con is all about giving back to the fans for Orlando Jones\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: This maverick Tom Cruise lookalike went from the danger zone to the ‘Top Gun’ bar in San Diego\t\t \t\t\t \t “Every time we do ‘Talking Dead’ they give us this beautiful gift and lately they have given me this bag that has the emergency cross on it and inside is a flashlight, emergency kit and I have three of them in my office,” Danay Garcia, who plays Luciana said. “I’m ready … and it was all courtesy of ‘Talking Dead.’” Chief Content Officer of “The Walking Dead” universe Scott M. Gimple said he liked “The Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman’s idea of how to survive in the zombie apocalypse or a major natural disaster, which was “he’d throw himself immediately off a bridge.” Gimple too said he wouldn’t last long in the worst-case-scenario and the recent earthquakes made him quickly think back over the past 10 years of what he’s put these cast members through. Jenna Elfman who plays Naomi on the show said that between being on the show and living in Southern California, she has started researching how to properly stock her emergency kits. Her day job has certainly given her a leg up on others when it comes to cutting it out in the wild should things go sideways since she learned survival skills, “not joyfully, but it has given me insight into that thought process.” “Fear the Walking Dead” is currently airing its fifth season and airs at 9 p.m. on Sundays on AMC. READ MORE about SDCC 2019 : Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day | Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports Super fans: “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures'

Nike Reveals First Two Commemorative Kyrie 5 ‘SpongeBob SquarePants’ Sneakers

Photo Geek.com

Nike Kyrie 5 'SpongeBob SquarePants' drops on August 10. (Photo Credit: Nike) You may  already know about how NBA superstar and newly-minted Brooklyn Nets member Kyrie Irving is a weird dude who’s pretty open to expressing his
'Nike Kyrie 5 'SpongeBob SquarePants' drops on August 10. (Photo Credit: Nike) \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t You may  already know  about how NBA superstar and newly-minted Brooklyn Nets member Kyrie Irving is a weird dude who’s pretty open to expressing his eccentricity through his dope signature sneakers . The dude has used the Kyrie 5 as a template for homages to everything from the TV show Friends to his obsession with the Illuminati and conspiracy theories. It’s rad. We could use more of that energy in both the basketball and sneaker world. However, the newest Kyrie 5 colorways are taking it to a whole ‘nother level.  (Photo Credit: Nike) Nike has officially revealed the first two shoes of what’s long been a rumor but is now one of the beautiful, bizarre certainties of the sneaker world: the Nike Kyrie 5 ‘SpongeBob’ collection . Perhaps you’re familiar with SpongeBob SquarePants, the cartoon character who (if I may refresh your memory) lives in a pineapple under the sea/is absorbent and yellow and porish. The show is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year , no small feat for an animated show and especially not for one as singularly bizarre as Spongebob Squarepants .  (Photo Credit: Nike) To commemorate this anniversary — and to pay homage to what Irving himself has proclaimed as one of his favorite TV shows – Nike is releasing not one, not two, but FIVE SpongeBob-inspired sneakers. The line features three Kyrie 5s and two Kyrie 2 Lows.  The first drops in the line are the SpongeBob and Patrick Kyrie 5s. The SpongeBob colorway features a yellow upper with spongy speckles scattered about. The Nickelodeon logo is visible on the tongue and a small print of SpongeBob’s face is visible on the insole of the shoe. Nike’s logo adorns the back, albeit this time in a SpongeBob-inspired font. Even the classic Nike Swoosh has been sponge-ified for the colorway. However, the best feature in my opinion is the subtle red accent along the side of the shoe, drawing to mind the character’s ever-present red tie.  (Photo Credit: Nike) The Patrick colorway features a number of the same touches, including the Nike logo on the heel, Patrick’s face on the insole, and a tiny Nickelodeon logo on the tongue. The primary upper is composed of a vibrant speckled pink and a lime-green and purple lower in tribute to the character’s floral-print trunks.  (Photo Credit: Nike) Both of these sneakers will be dropping on August 10 via Nike’s SNKRS app . For now, they’re the only ones with official release dates (a select few sneakerheads were actually able to secure the shoe via early release today but that window has long since closed). However, there are still three more shoes in the lineup. Keep your ears to the ground for more info on the Kyrie 5 Squidward and the Kyrie 2 Low Sandy, as well as a Kyrie 2 Low that looks like it could be an homage to either Mr. Krabs or Mrs. Puff.  More on Geek.com: Check Out These Cool Apollo 11 Anniversary Sneakers From Nike, Puma This Nike Sneaker Is Inspired by ‘Coming to America’ Nike’s Newest Air Max 97 Is Inspired by the Nintendo 64'

Comic-Con 2019: ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ stars say recent earthquakes have them rethinking survival skills

Culture and Entertainment Press Enterprise

Stars from the hit AMC show discussed at Comic-Con what they'd need to survive a real-life natural disaster.
'Just hours after being told that the show had been renewed for a sixth season , cast members of AMC’s “Fear the Walking Dead” hit the press room at Comic-Con International in San Diego on Friday with big smiles. The spin-off of wildly popular zombie-filled drama, “The Walking Dead,” has become a stand-alone sensation. It even has experienced successful crossovers with both Morgan Jones (played by Lennie James) and Dwight (Austin Amelio) making the jump from the mother ship and fitting in just right with the rest of the cast on “Fear the Walking Dead.” The show itself is about survival and during the conference the cast members said that the recent 6.4 and 7.1-magnitude earthquakes that shook Ridgecrest earlier this month had them rethinking some of their own real-life disaster survival skills. The cast #FearTWD #TheWalkingDead #SDCC #HallH pic.twitter.com/vJ6GNz0hld — Undead Walking (@UndeadWalkingFS) July 19, 2019 “If you live in California, you have to be prepared,” Rubén Blades, who plays Daniel Salazar, said, adding that if disaster were to strike, all he’d really need is “9,000 cans of pork and beans and 300,000 rolls of toilet paper.” Related Articles \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: George Takei draws from personal experiences in Japanese internment camps for ‘The Terror: Infamy’\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: Senator Cory Booker walks convention floor, hangs out with ‘Star Trek’ fans\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: That dancing horror creature wandering the floor hopes to be a monster hit\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con is all about giving back to the fans for Orlando Jones\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tComic-Con 2019: This maverick Tom Cruise lookalike went from the danger zone to the ‘Top Gun’ bar in San Diego\t\t \t\t\t \t “Every time we do ‘Talking Dead’ they give us this beautiful gift and lately they have given me this bag that has the emergency cross on it and inside is a flashlight, emergency kit and I have three of them in my office,” Danay Garcia, who plays Luciana said. “I’m ready … and it was all courtesy of ‘Talking Dead.’” Chief Content Officer of “The Walking Dead” universe Scott M. Gimple said he liked “The Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman’s idea of how to survive in the zombie apocalypse or a major natural disaster, which was “he’d throw himself immediately off a bridge.” Gimple too said he wouldn’t last long in the worst-case-scenario and the recent earthquakes made him quickly think back over the past 10 years of what he’s put these cast members through. Jenna Elfman who plays Naomi on the show said that between being on the show and living in Southern California, she has started researching how to properly stock her emergency kits. Her day job has certainly given her a leg up on others when it comes to cutting it out in the wild should things go sideways since she learned survival skills, “not joyfully, but it has given me insight into that thought process.” “Fear the Walking Dead” is currently airing its fifth season and airs at 9 p.m. on Sundays on AMC. READ MORE about SDCC 2019 : Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day | Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports Super fans: “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures'

6 Shot In Lincoln Park Near Fullerton Beach

Public Protection CBS Chicago

CHICAGO (CBS)– Six people were shot in Lincoln Park near Fullerton Beach early Saturday morning. At least three adult victims were taken to Illinois Masonic Hospital in critical condition, according to the Chicago Fire Department. Officers arrived
'CHICAGO (CBS)– Six people were shot in Lincoln Park near Fullerton Beach early Saturday morning. At least three adult victims were taken to Illinois Masonic Hospital in critical condition, according to the Chicago Fire Department. Officers arrived at Fullerton and Lake Shore Drive to find six victims just after 3 a.m. Evidence technicians found shell casings right in front of Theater on the Lake at Fullerton and Lake Shore Drive where six people were shot. Police say it started as an argument between two groups. @cbschicago pic.twitter.com/EoWfZIxFsg — Vi Nguyen (@ViNguyen) July 20, 2019 Evidence technicians found multiple shell casings at the scene just steps from the Theater on the Lake. Police said the shooting began as an argument between two groups. One group was leaving the lake front and another was arriving when words were exchanged. Police said a person in each group started shooting. Police have license plate reader cameras along the lake front, but a suspect has not yet been identified. This shooting was just one of several shootings that happened overnight across the city. Nineteen people were shot and two killed.'

The 2020 Corvette Is at the Large and Heavy End of the Mid-Engined Crowd

Space Car and Driver

But it uses its dimensions to provide generous passenger and cargo space.
'We compare the C8 Corvette 's dimensions to those of the existing mid-engined field to see how it stacks up The C8 is larger and heavier than nearly all of today's mid-engined cars, but its generous dimensions yield impressive passenger and cargo space. A claimed ability to blast to 60 mph in under three seconds puts the C8 on par with many exotics that are vastly more expensive. The mid-engined Corvette has made its official debut . Moving the engine behind the occupants is the Corvette's most significant change in its 66-year history, so now we're anxious to see how it compares to the rest of the mid-engined sports cars on offer. Obviously, these aren't really the Corvette's direct peers, as most mid-engined cars—save for the Porsche Cayman —cost many times more than the starting price of the new Corvette, which Chevy promises will be right around $60,000 . But the fact that the C8 is such a mid-engined outlier is a testament to just how large of an achievement it is. First, the C8 Corvette is large. At 107.2 inches, its wheelbase is a half-inch longer than the front-engine C7 it replaces, and many inches longer than the Acura NSX , Audi R8, Ferrari F8 Tributo , Lamborghini Huracan Evo, and McLaren 570S and 720S. And it's just shy of 10 inches longer than the Porsche Cayman's. (It's nearly 11 inches longer than the 911 's wheelbase—yeah, we know that car doesn't have its engine in the middle, but it's been a longstanding Corvette competitor so we could help but include it.) The closest current mid-engined competitor is the Ford GT at 106.7 inches. Overall length on the C8 stretches 5.3 inches longer than the C7, and it's roughly 3 to 10 inches longer than the mid-engined field listed above, with the exception of the Ford GT, which is 5.2 inches longer still. The new Corvette, at 76.1 inches, is 2.2 inches wider than the C7, which puts it in the zone with most of the cars listed above, although everything but the McLarens and the Porsche Cayman and 911 are wider. The C8 is dramatically wider than the Porsches; 5.2 inches more so than the Cayman and 3.2 inches girthier than the 911. Large for a Reason Large exterior dimensions portend generous passenger and cargo space; the latter has been a long-running Corvette strong suit. That remains true in the C8. Its head- and legroom figures nearly match the C7's (legroom is down by 0.2 inch), which is above the mid-engined-supercar average. From the driver's seat, it feels more spacious than the C7, although the Cayman, R8, and NSX have more headroom. The C8's rear trunk is especially large for a mid-engined car, a deep well that can swallow two full-size golf bags stacked on top of each other. There's also a front trunk that can hold a carry-on-sized suitcase. Although the C8's cargo volume is slightly lower on paper, we're convinced that it's plenty to accommodate any reasonable everyday needs. But generous dimensions also mean mass, especially at the Corvette's aggressive price that doesn't allow engineers to throw endless expensive lightweight materials at it. Chevy is being coy on weight by only divulging a dry-weight figure of 3366 pounds. That implies a curb weight of roughly 3600 pounds, which is about 150 pounds heavier than the C7 (which itself gained 100 pounds over the C6). That makes it far heavier than the mid-engined cadre, more than 400 pounds above the lightest, such as the Cayman and the McLarens. Only the Audi R8 and the Acura NSX, which is laden with electric motors and a battery pack, weigh more. Rear-Heavy for Blastoff Chevy also hasn't yet divulged the C8's weight distribution, but on the collection of mid-engined cars above, it ranges from 56.5 percent of the vehicle's weight on the rear axle (Cayman) to 59.3 percent (Ford GT). The C7 has a slight rear-weight bias, but the C8 will carry significantly more of its mass on the rear axle. That's precisely the point. That rear-weight bias allows the C8 to hook up better than ever. Combined with the rapid-shifting dual-clutch automatic with a proper launch-control function and the additional horsepower from the revised 6.2-liter LT2 V-8 that's now making as much as 495 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque, Chevy promises that models equipped with the Z51 performance package will be able to hit 60 mph in less than three seconds. That puts it in the hunt with most of the exotica above, which is a monumentally impressive achievement indeed.'