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News from Minnesota

Washington County deputy who shot reportedly suicidal EMT scheduled for court appearance

Law and Order Twin Cities

The Washington County sheriff’s deputy indicted last week on a charge of second-degree manslaughter in connection with the 2018 shooting death of a 23-year-old Lake Elmo man will make his first court appearance on Wednesday afternoon. Deputy Brian
'The Washington County sheriff’s deputy indicted last week on a charge of second-degree manslaughter in connection with the 2018 shooting death of a 23-year-old Lake Elmo man will make his first court appearance on Wednesday afternoon. Deputy Brian Krook, 31, shot and killed Benjamin W. Evans shortly after midnight on April 12, 2018, according to police reports. Police said Evans was holding a handgun when Krook and other Washington County deputies responded to a 911 call of “a suicidal man with a gun” in Lake Elmo. Benjamin Evans Evans was an emergency medical technician and the father of a 3-year-old daughter named Lydia Rose. His parents said in a statement, “We have waited patiently to understand what happened to Ben, praying for truth and justice. In the meantime, we have been keeping Ben’s memory alive for his 3-year-old daughter. He was an extraordinary young man who loved life, his family, his fellow man and his country.” On the night he was killed, Evans told officers he wanted to kill himself while “officers made repeated attempts to persuade him to put down the gun,” police said. “At one point, Deputy Krook discharged his firearm, striking Evans multiple times.” FAMILY ‘IN THE DARK’ ABOUT DETAILS OF DEATH Attorneys for Evans’ family said Tuesday they remain “in the dark” as to details about Evans’ death and had not yet seen the indictment. Pete Sandberg and Elham Haddon, attorneys in Rochester who specialize in wrongful-death cases, said they have been retained by Bill Evans and Kim Porter, Evans’ parents. The attorneys previously represented Benjamin Evans in a worker’s compensation case and employment claim. “The family decided that since he trusted us, they trusted us,” Haddon said. Bill Evans was a firefighter, and Ben Evans followed in his father’s footsteps, finishing his EMT class before his 18th birthday, his parents said in a statement provided to the Pioneer Press. “Ben Evans came from a military family and dreamed of a life of service,” the statement said. “After enlisting in the Air Force, a knee injury prevented him from serving his country so he came to Minnesota to serve the community as an EMT firefighter. He cherished the uniform and all the public servants who wore it. His job was to save lives. It is incomprehensible that his life should be taken when he needed a public servant to save him.” According to his obituary, Ben Evans was “very proud and passionate of being a firefighter and EMT. He enjoyed sports and especially loved playing hockey.” His funeral service was held in Creve Coeur, Mo., where his family lived. BCA: OFFICERS REPEATEDLY TOLD EVANS TO DROP A GUN Benjamin Evans Because of prosecutors’ conflict of interest in Washington County, the case was referred to Ramsey County to review for possible charges, according to the Ramsey County attorney’s office. Evans’ parents said they were grateful to Ramsey County prosecutors “for their efforts in concluding this investigation.” On Wednesday, Krook will make his first court appearance before Sherburne County District Court Judge Mary Yunker in Washington County District Court in Stillwater; judges in Washington County recused themselves due to a conflict of interest, officials said. When Evans was found in April 2018 near Lake Elmo Avenue and 34th Street, he told officers he wanted to kill himself, according to the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Officers repeatedly told him to drop the gun before Krook shot Evans several times, police said. Related Articles \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tInver Grove Heights massage business was a front for prostitution, charges say\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tMan accused of violent, apparently random home invasion in Inver Grove Heights\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tDeparting deputy corrections commissioner says she’s under investigation for lobbying on state time. Not true, she says.\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tReport: Sheriff’s deputy charged in Lake Elmo death of armed suicidal man\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tA bloody trail led police to a St. Paul woman’s lifeless body. Her boyfriend shot her during an argument, charges say.\t\t \t\t\t \t The BCA reported that a handgun was found near Evans’ body. A non-lethal bean bag shotgun also was recovered, but apparently had not been fired, the bureau reported. Body-worn and car-mounted cameras recorded some parts of the incident, but not all of it, according to the BCA. Krook has been with the sheriff’s office for nine years. After the shooting, Krook was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation by the BCA. Neither Krook nor a union representative could be reached for comment. On Monday, Minnesota Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington and Attorney General Keith Ellison announced they will host three public hearings, beginning in August, to discuss the best way to handle shootings by police . The outcome is slated to be recommendations, which could include state or local policy changes, updates to procedures, legislative initiatives, training, officer wellness, community healing or recognition of best practices utilized by law enforcement agencies.'

Rep. Ilhan Omar and ‘squad’ school House Democrats in social competition

Politics Roll Call

Rep. Ilhan Omar stole the social spotlight in House Democrats’ tenth annual Member Online All-Star Competition. The Minnesota Democrat is the first freshman to win the overall popularity contest, cleaning up with nearly 150,000 new followers.
'Rep. Ilhan Omar stole the social spotlight in House Democrats’ tenth annual Member Online All-Star Competition. The Minnesota Democrat is the first freshman to win the overall popularity contest, cleaning up with nearly 150,000 new followers.Following oh so closely behind? The rest of Omar's “squad,” of course: freshman Reps. Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez who rounded out the top five, along with Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro.The internal contest, sponsored by Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, asks Democrats in Congress to bulk up their followings on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube over a three-week period.This year, that period — July 1 to July 21 — happened to coincide with a Twitter firestorm set off by Donald Trump. Lashing out at the four women of the squad, the president tweeted that they should “go back” to “the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.” The freshman women addressed Trump’s racist attacks in a press conference, and pretty much everyone on social media chimed in.The squad handily beat out two members on the national stage: 2020 candidate Rep.Tulsi Gabbard and former presidential contender Eric Swalwell, who both made the top 50.[N.C. crowd chants ‘Send her back’ as Trump criticizes Omar and House ‘squad’]And Omar also outshone Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who technically earned the No. 2 spot with 112,000 new followers — but bowed out of the running, since according to the rules of this internal competition, members of leadership aren’t eligible to win awards.All told, House Democrats collectively gained 1.7 million followers in three weeks, which is “over 2.5 times more growth than we’ve ever had,” Hoyer said in a statement.[Omar’s office facade gets covered with notes of support]The winning lineup couldn’t have come as a surprise to party leaders, who have both clashed with the progressive newcomers and leaned on their mastery of social platforms and messaging.If anything, the competition fails to capture the full extent of the squad's prowess, since it measures only the followers gained on lawmakers’ official House platforms.On her official House Twitter account, @RepAOC, Ocasio-Cortez has fewer than 200,000 followers, a number dwarfed by the nearly 5 million people who follow the account she set up before her election, @AOC.[Hello Congress, goodbye Twitter followers]As for Omar, she may have boosted her official reach, but her House Twitter account still can’t compete with @IlhanMN, followed by 1.4 million people.The Members’ Congressional Handbook says lawmakers can’t use their official social media accounts for campaigning, grassroots lobbying or endorsing a product or service.While members can keep updating their personal accounts to their heart’s content, they’re barred from using “official resources” to maintain them. That means no congressional staff time and no office funds.var rcrdJWPlayer = 1;Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.'

Vikings’ Holton Hill hit with a second four-game NFL suspension for substance issues

Politics Twin Cities

Vikings cornerback Holton Hill was suspended Tuesday for four more games by the NFL for violating the league’s policy on substances of abuse. He previously was suspended for the first four games for violating the policy on performance-enhancing
'Vikings cornerback Holton Hill was suspended Tuesday for four more games by the NFL for violating the league’s policy on substances of abuse. He previously was suspended for the first four games for violating the policy on performance-enhancing substances, meaning he will be out for the first eight regular-season games. Hill, entering his second season, remains eligible to participate in all of the Vikings’ training camp activities and their four preseason games. The first regular-season game in which he will be eligible to play is Nov. 3 at Kansas City. The Vikings began training camp Tuesday at the TCO Performance Center in Eagan with 37 rookies and select veterans. All other players, including Hill, are scheduled to report Thursday, with the first full-squad workout Friday. Hill’s initial four-game suspension was handed down on April 5. He told the Pioneer Press last month that he took a substance before a workout and was unaware it was on the banned list. He declined to name the substance. “I’m just learning from my mistakes, knowing what you put into your body,” Hill said last month. “I’m responsible for everything that goes into it. I’m taking it as a learning experience, and I’m just growing from there. …I have to be more educated with, like, pre-workouts and stuff I take.” Related Articles \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tVikings GM Rick Spielman optimistic about a bounce-back season\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tVikings’ Chad Beebe ‘wearing out’ a JUGS machine as he competes for playing time\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tTiano Pupungatoa of River Falls calls it ‘surreal’ joining Vikings, replaces waived Roc Thomas\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tLong snapper Austin Cutting is last of Vikings’ 12 draft picks to sign\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tVikings rookie TE Irv Smith gets motivation from tattoo of late grandfather\t\t \t\t\t \t Last week, the NFL suspended then-Vikings running back Roc Thomas, for the first three regular-season games for violating the policy on substances of abuse. Thomas, who was found guilty in May of possessing marijuana and can have his record cleared if he successfully completes a three-year probation period, was waived Monday and the Vikings signed guard Tiano Pupungatoa, who is from River Falls, Wis., to take his place on the roster. Vikings general manager Rick Spielman, speaking before Hill’s second suspension was announced, was asked Tuesday how much Thomas’ legal issues and his suspension played into the decision to release him. “We base all of our decisions off football decisions, so we evaluate these guys from the minute they walk into our offseason program,” Spielman said. “Where we are at (Pupungatoa), he showed up at our rookie tryout camp, he was a tryout guy. We were monitoring him, we talked to him afterwards that we wanted to get him back at some point.”'

CBS Sports: Adrian Peterson Appears To Be Having Serious Financial Problems

Career and Work WCCO | CBS Minnesota

Former star Minnesota Vikings running back is reportedly facing financial difficulties, despite making nearly $100 million in his NFL career.
'MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Former star Minnesota Vikings running back is reportedly facing financial difficulties, despite making nearly $100 million in his NFL career. According to CBS Sports, Peterson’s financial woes were caused by Peterson trusting the wrong people, and have led to at least three different lawsuits. “The truth behind Adrian Peterson’s current financial situation is more than is being reported at this time,” Carlson said in a statement. “Because of ongoing legal matters, I am unable to go into detail, but I will say this is yet another situation of an athlete trusting the wrong people and being taken advantage of by those he trusted. Adrian and his family look forward to sharing further details when appropriate.” Although Carlson didn’t offer any specific details on Peterson’s financial situation, the three lawsuits do provide a small glimpse into the running back’s money problems. The first lawsuit, which was filed in Minnesota in October 2017, accused Peterson of defaulting on a $2.4 million loan. Read more on CBS Sports.'

Vikings’ Holton Hill suspended four additional games by NFL for substance abuse

Politics Twin Cities

Vikings cornerback Holton Hill was suspended Tuesday four additional games by the NFL for violating the league’s policy on substances of abuse. He previously was suspended for the first four games for violating the policy on performance-enhancing
'Vikings cornerback Holton Hill was suspended Tuesday four additional games by the NFL for violating the league’s policy on substances of abuse. He previously was suspended for the first four games for violating the policy on performance-enhancing substances, meaning he will be out for the first eight regular-season games. Hill, entering his second season, remains eligible to participate in all of the Vikings’ training camp activities and their four preseason games. The first regular-season game in which he will be eligible to play will be Nov. 3 at Kansas City. The Vikings began training camp Tuesday at the TCO Performance Center with 37 rookies and select veterans. All other players, including Hill, are scheduled to report Thursday, with the first full-squad workout Friday. Hill’s initial four-game suspension was handed down on April 5. He told the Pioneer Press last month that he took a substance before a workout and was unaware it was on the banned list. He declined to name the substance. “I’m just learning from my mistakes, knowing what you put into your body,” Hill said last month. “I’m responsible for everything that goes into it. I’m taking it as a learning experience, and I’m just growing from there. …I have to be more educated with like pre-workouts and stuff I take.” The NFL last week suspended then-Vikings running back Roc Thomas, for the first three regular-season games for violating the policy on substances of abuse. Thomas, who was found guilty in May of possessing marijuana and can have his record cleared if he successfully completes a three-year probation period, was waived Monday and the Vikings signed guard Tiano Pupungatoa, who is from River Falls, to take his place. Vikings general manager Rick Spielman, speaking before Hill’s second suspension was announced, was asked Tuesday how much Thomas’ legal issues and his suspension played into the decision to release him. “We base all of our decisions off football decisions, so we evaluate these guys from the minute they walk into our off season program,” Spielman said. “Where we are at (Pupungatoa), he showed up at our rookie tryout camp, he was a tryout guy. We were monitoring him, we talked to him afterwards that we wanted to get him back at some point.” Related Articles \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tVikings’ Chad Beebe ‘wearing out’ a JUGS machine as he competes for playing time\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tTiano Pupungatoa of River Falls calls it ‘surreal’ joining Vikings, replaces waived Roc Thomas\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tLong snapper Austin Cutting is last of Vikings’ 12 draft picks to sign\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tVikings rookie TE Irv Smith gets motivation from tattoo of late grandfather\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tVikings rookie Austin Cutting to be used for Air Force recruiting while being permitted to play in NFL'