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1st Female Freeride Movie: ‘VISION’ MTB Premiere Coming Soon

Outdoor GearJunkie

Five Ten and adidas present 'VISION,' a female-led freeride mountain bike film coming July 30, 2019.
'Five Ten and adidas present ‘VISION,’ a female-led freeride mountain bike film coming July 30, 2019.Veronique Sandler, a former World Cup racer, paved her own way in the mountain bike industry . This new film, “VISION,” captures her outlook on the future of a sport.Taking inspiration from the streets, dirt jumping, and freeride, this action-focused documentary follows Sandler ‘s journey alongside her heroes as she brings her “vision” to life.Working in partnership with Revolution Bike Park in Wales, U.K., they made her dream a reality.The film stars Sandler and a collective of the best riders from around the world.If the trailer stokes your excitement, expect the full film to hit iTunes, Xbox, Playstation, Google Play, Amazon, Vudu, Fandango Now, and Vimeo on Demand on July 30.Watch Travis Rice's Winning Line From the Freeride World Tour Watch Travis Rice spin a 720 and stomp a backflip on this winning run from the Freeride World Tour in Japan.Read more… . The post 1st Female Freeride Movie: ‘VISION’ MTB Premiere Coming Soon appeared first on GearJunkie .'

Here’s what the Apple iPhone 11’s rumored new Taptic Engine might do

Apple USA News Hub

Over the past decade, cellular phones have evolved from delivering aggressively buzzy vibrating alerts to more nuanced “haptic feedback” — digitally-created forces that respond to touch. While there were evolutionary steps before Apple debuted the
'Over the past decade, cellular phones have evolved from delivering aggressively buzzy vibrating alerts to more nuanced “haptic feedback” — digitally-created forces that respond to touch. While there were evolutionary steps before Apple debuted the iPhone 6S with a Taptic Engine , that 2015 device marked a turning point for smartphone haptics, bringing deeper and more realistic touch sensations into pocketable devices. Now there’s a report that Apple will upgrade the Taptic Engine for the iPhone 11 family, so I’ve assembled some clues regarding the types of new features it might include. It’s worth noting up front that neither today’s 9to5Mac report nor Apple’s key Taptic Engine supplier, Japan’s Nidec Seimitsu,  offers any concrete details on what the next-generation vibration actuator might do. Moreover, Apple has been more conservative in using haptics than Android rivals, even shying away from using mini vibrations to confirm virtual keyboard presses. So treat the following list as a collection of possibilities rather than anything definitive, and you won’t be disappointed when the new iPhones are unveiled in September. 1. More complex vibrations. Nintendo’s Switch debuted a distinctive haptic feature called HD Rumble , which has famously simulated sensations such as multiple ice cubes clinking in a glass, or dice in a box. Immersion, the company behind that feature , suggested nearly a decade ago that its HD haptics would become popular in smartphones. Since then, it’s continued to advance similar features in Android devices. In Apple’s hands, complex next-generation haptics could empower a wider and more nuanced range of responses to input: the feeling of a finger navigating over bumps, a pencil dragging against paper, or thumps that appear to be coming from different locations inside the iPhone. That said, there have been signs for years that Apple has wanted to add complex haptics like these to bigger-screened iPads, but it just hasn’t happened,  supposedly due to the engineering challenges of distributing sensations across larger surface areas — but possibly due to patent concerns. An otherwise slow (read: no 5G) iPhone year like this could be a good time to overhaul the device’s entire interface with haptic feedback. It might be too much to hope for Apple to implement Android-style key tap haptics for the virtual keyboard at this point, but perhaps the company was waiting on a very specific type of key feedback that only a next-generation actuator could deliver. Or maybe it’s once again hoping that third-party developers will come up with more novel uses of the idea. 2. More frequent vibrations across different types of apps.  If a vibration motor consumes relatively little power and is reliable enough, it could be used for all sorts of purposes without fear of either killing the device’s battery, or breaking. Nidec describes some of its motors as capable of “interlocking” with music and games to vibrate along with beats, creating the sense of “listening to a music performance in a concert hall,” or immersion in the action. Apple has historically underplayed the vibration capabilities of its devices, using the little motors largely to respond to inputs rather than as persistent output drivers — except for silencing ringtones. But with the right component, and the right support from Apple’s software teams, anything’s possible. 3. More powerful vibrations.  This one is possible, but hard to imagine in an Apple device: the next Taptic Engine might be capable of really rattling your hands when necessary, coming closer to the jostle of a game controller than the buzz of a smartphone. For a variety of physical reasons, including ever-thinning iPhone chassis designs and the potential for abuse, this one seems somewhat unlikely. 4. Less powerful or disruptive vibrations.  As boring as this sounds, it’s not as implausible as it might seem. Prior to the Taptic Engine, Apple changed the vibration actuators in earlier iPhones to reduce their likelihood of accidentally vibrating (largely glass, easily breakable) devices off of flat surfaces. Given Apple’s continued focus on luxury experiences, it might want to preserve the current Engine’s vibration sensations without making them feel as harsh. It might also want to cut the power consumed by the actuator to improve device battery life. My guess is that this one is largely unlikely. The Taptic Engine is already capable of delivering relatively low-power taps that are almost impossible to feel unless the phone is in your hand, and users tend to complain when they can’t feel the device’s promised haptic responses. Apple wouldn’t need an all-new part to deliver weak haptics, either. But it’s possible that a next generation Taptic Engine could be more power efficient, or support a wider range of force levels. 5. Mid-air vibrations, at a distance.  As wild as this sounds, a company called Ultrahaptics has created an ultrasonic haptics system that can be felt in the air, without physically touching the actuator — a system that notably has potential applications in the AR and VR spaces. The idea is to let people physically feel and manipulate virtual objects they’re seeing through AR or VR headsets, providing up to eight separate touch points at up to 27.5 inches away from the device. You might recognize Ultrahaptics’ name from its May acquisition of Leap Motion , a company Apple reportedly considered buying and ultimately walked away from. Moreover, since 9to5Mac’s report today claims that the new Taptic Engine is “known by the codename leap haptics ,” that could be a clue. I won’t be holding my breath on this one, though, due to Ultrahaptics’ system’s size and the lack of obvious value in implementing such a feature — yet — in an iPhone. The company’s publicly known actuators are closer to laptop-sized than pocketable, and there’s no indication that the company has developed something that could fit inside a smartphone. Even if it did, the value would be questionable: without an AR/VR-style image floating in front of your phone, what need would you have for mid-air haptics? For years, there have been suggestions that Apple and others were working on mid-air gesture controls for various devices, and sure, it might be cool to “feel” the press of a floating play/pause button or a sliding volume control that isn’t actually there. But without AR or VR glasses, you’d need to view UI elements and other objects through the iPhone’s own screen, which you’d be holding in your hand with no need for mid-air haptics. This doesn’t really add up. Realistically, if the iPhone 11 does in fact get a new Taptic Engine, the most likely innovations would be bits and pieces of the first four concepts above — a little extra thump here, a more precise or subtle clink there, and a reliable enough part to keep functioning despite lots of additional triggers from the OS and apps. In a year when I’m leaning towards holding off on purchasing a new iPhone, my personal hope is that Apple has decided to  deprecate 3D Touch  for a good reason, and has ambitious haptic plans in store for September.'

Cambridge Touch Technologies raises $10 million to let you text underwater

Technology USA News Hub

Cambridge Touch Technologies, a University of Cambridge spinout that’s commercializing 3D multitouch technology, today announced the recent closure of a $10 million series B funding round led by Kureha Corporation. This brings the startup’s total
'Cambridge Touch Technologies , a University of Cambridge spinout that’s commercializing 3D multitouch technology, today announced the recent closure of a $10 million series B funding round led by Kureha Corporation. This brings the startup’s total raised to nearly $20 million. Parkwalk also participated, as did a raft of other investors, including Downing Ventures, CM Ventures, Amadeus Capital Partners, Puhua Capital, and Futaba Corporation. Cofounder and CEO Corbin Church says the cash infusion will fuel the commercial rollout of Cambridge Touch Technologies’ products and the expansion of its teams in the U.K., China, Taiwan, and soon Japan. Furthermore, he expects the relationship with Kureha will strengthen the company’s supply chain and create new options for high-volume clients. “We’re delighted to welcome our new corporate and VC investors from Japan and China, as well as having the continued strong support of our existing investors, who together form a world-class group that will help scale Cambridge Touch Technologies quickly to exploit the market opportunity for its technology. Cambridge Touch Technologies has grown rapidly over the last several years, and we’re looking forward to being able to continue executing on our growth plan and sharpening our commercialization focus within the consumer electronics, automotive, and industrial markets. The partners we have and the injection of new capital means we can expect to enable our customers to begin rolling out the technology at scale in the near future.” The company’s solution — UltraTouch — sits on or above device displays and registers touch from bare fingers, gloved fingers, and styluses — even when wet or underwater. A single piezoelectric-based sensor — a film that creates an electrical charge when mechanically stressed — together with transparent electrodes handles force and capacitive location-sensing without the need for external components, thanks in part to an AI engine that can sense both touch and force signals on the same electrodes. It’s fully compatible with OLED and LCD conventional or bezel-less flat, curved, foldable, and flexible displays, Cambridge Touch Technologies says, and can even power toggle the screen to which it’s attached. Cambridge Touch Technologies isn’t the first to market with futuristic display-bound control schemes. U.K.-based Redux, which was acquired by Google last January, pioneered feedback technology that adds audio to off-the-shelf touchscreens and enables the sensation of physical keys. Tanvas’ TanvasTouch technology, the fruit of research conducted at the Neuroscience and Robotics Lab at Northwestern University, physically pulls at fingertips like an electromagnet as they move across the screen. And several years ago, Bosch demoed a concept convertible featuring a haptic touchscreen that generated the feel of real buttons. But Cambridge Touch Technologies isn’t just targeting the consumer electronics market. It says it has developed engineering samples of its tech for customers in a range of markets, among them automotive, industrial, and defense. “As the leading global supplier of Piezoelectric film, Kureha Corporation has worked closely with Cambridge Touch Technologies over recent years, bringing our substantial resources and R&D capabilities to our joint collaboration and developing the most advanced piezoelectric film for the touch panel market now and into the future,” said Kureha president and CEO Yutaka Kobayashi. “It was only natural, therefore, for us to lead the Series B round with a direct investment and become shareholders in the company. The alignment between the two companies is strong. We look forward to playing an important role in Cambridge Touch Technologies’ continued success and bright future.” Sign up for Funding Daily : Get the latest news in your inbox every weekday.'

July 23 marks one year until the start of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Trotting WREX

The games begin July 24, 2020, however broadcasting in the U.S. will start July 23 because of the 14-hour time difference between Rockford and Tokyo.
'TOKYO (WREX) — Tuesday, July 23 marks one year until the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.The games begin July 24, 2020, however broadcasting in the U.S. will start July 23 because of the 14-hour time difference between Rockford and Tokyo.More than 11,000 athletes from 206 countries are expected to compete.A record-high 339 medals will be up for grabs across 41 sports.New to the Olympics is skateboarding, surfing, 3 x 3 baseball, karate and sport climbing events.Baseball and softball will return to the games after a 12-year hiatus.The 2020 Olympics marks the fourth Olympics staged in Japan, following Tokyo 1964 (summer), Sapporo 1972 (winter) and Nagano 1988 (winter). The games run until Aug. 9, 2020.The Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 is set for two weeks after the end of the Olympics.It will feature 22 sports, including the debut of badminton and taekwondo on the Paralympic program.For more information on the Tokyo Olympic Games, you can  head to the NBC Olympics website. . The post July 23 marks one year until the start of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics appeared first on WREX .'

Hawaii’s $18 billion tourism industry is the latest victim of the US-China trade fight

Law and Order USA News Hub

The pool at Turtle Bay Resort on Oahu’s North Shore. Amanda Macias | CNBC KAWELA BAY, HI — A growing cloud of economic anxiety is looming over Hawaii, as the ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies threatens to cut off a
'The pool at Turtle Bay Resort on Oahu’s North Shore. Amanda Macias | CNBC KAWELA BAY, HI — A growing cloud of economic anxiety is looming over Hawaii, as the ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies threatens to cut off a once-steady flow of Chinese tourists. As of June, Chinese visitor arrivals have dropped by about 36% compared with the same period last year, according to figures provided by the Hawaiian Tourism Authority . “Hawaii would like to capture more of this lucrative market, but two federal issues diminish our growth opportunities: visa requirements and the Trump administration’s antagonistic trade policies. As long as the U.S. puts restrictions on travel and takes on a more combative political posture, the Chinese will choose to vacation elsewhere,” Hawaii state Sen. Glenn Wakai told CNBC. “The Chinese have an appetite to travel, and they do so with fat wallets. Hawaii would like to lay out the welcome beach mat, but we cannot do so if the federal government doesn’t unlock the door,” he added. The Asian market is a vital tourism sector for Hawaii, Wakai said. “One out of every four jobs in Hawaii is directly related to tourism, so any negative impact on demand from Asia could cripple Hawaii’s economy,” he said. Last month, President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Japan to restart negotiations and not impose new tariffs on each other’s goods. Trade talks collapsed in May, with intellectual property theft proving to be a major sticking point between the two parties. “We can’t let politics get in the way, because at the end of the day, tourism is a major economic revenue generator throughout the world,” Mufi Hannemann, president and CEO of the Hawaii Lodging and Tourism Association, told CNBC when asked about the trade war between Washington and Beijing. Hannemann said that in the past few years there has been a decline in Chinese visitor numbers to Hawaii but that the Trump administration’s current policy “only exacerbates the situation.” A view of a beach at Oahu’s Kualoa Regional Park. Amanda Macias | CNBC In 2018, nearly 10 million travelers from around the world visited the Aloha State’s sun-soaked islands, generating $18 billion and employing more than 200,000 people. About 20% of those visitors traveled from Asia, with Japan, Korea and China providing the lion’s share. And while Chinese tourists represent less than 2% of Hawaii’s total visitor count, they stay longer and spend more money compared with other Asian travelers. On average, a Chinese tourist stays a little more than eight days and spends approximately $350 a day when vacationing in Hawaii. “The Chinese certainly have a reputation of being high-end travelers. They like to eat at fine restaurants, they visit upscale shops, and they’re adventurous too, since they tend to book excursions and like to move around the island,” Hannemann said. “There is also a lot in Hawaii that lends itself to be very Chinese-friendly in terms of the culture we have here,” he said. “It’s a place that they can easily identify with, and we offer everything that they like to see when they travel except for gambling. So, it’s a market that we know, and the money that is generated from their visits to Hawaii is something that we take very seriously.” “I’m hoping that cooler heads will prevail over this,” he added.'

Johnson’s win elevates ‘no-deal’ Brexit risks to UK economy

Politics Boston Herald

LONDON (AP) — With Boris Johnson confirmed as the next leader of the Conservative Party and British prime minister, the outlook for the British economy has certainly become murkier — and potentially more perilous.
'By PAN PYLAS LONDON (AP) — With Boris Johnson confirmed as the next leader of the Conservative Party and British prime minister, the outlook for the British economy has certainly become murkier — and potentially more perilous. Johnson’s comprehensive victory over Jeremy Hunt has made it more likely that Britain could leave the European Union on Halloween without a withdrawal agreement, a prospect that even the most ardent Brexit believers concede would be disruptive in the short-term before any benefits start to manifest. Most economists think a so-called “no-deal” Brexit will be a lot worse than that. A deep recession is widely predicted for that scenario. Whether it would be as deep as the one that followed the global financial crisis — more than 6% — no-one knows, but almost all economists agree that jobs will be lost and that public finances will get stretched. A “no-deal” Brexit effectively means that on Nov. 1, tariffs will be slapped on traded goods between the U.K. and the remaining 27 EU countries. Other impediments to trade, including on Britain’s crucial financial services sector, will have to be imposed, such as new restrictions on the movement of people, customs and regulatory standards. Britain would also face the prospect of losing the trade deals the EU has struck over the years, including recent ones with Canada, South Korea and Japan — these account for around 11% of U.K. trade. Richard Branson, the Virgin Group founder whose career has taken him from owning a record label to planning flights to space, thinks it will be a disaster — so much so that the pound will slump in value to be worth just a dollar for the first time ever. The pound has borne the brunt of Brexit uncertainty, falling more than 10% from $1.50 on the day after the June 2016 referendum. It’s near two-year lows at $1.2450 as the “no-deal” talk escalates. Though both sides of the English Channel will suffer in a “no-deal” scenario, Britain would suffer relatively more given that British exports to the EU account for around 13% of the country’s annual GDP, versus 2.5% of the EU’s. Planning for a “no-deal” Brexit, which Johnson is expected to accelerate in his first days in 10 Downing Street, will help marginally. Measures such as stockpiling medicines, sourcing more products from outside the EU or modifying road links in southeast England around the port of Dover to manage freight traffic can help, but only up to a point. “Planning is unlikely to do much to mitigate the short-term disruption of ‘no deal’,” said John Springford, deputy director at the Centre for European Reform. For one, he said, there is “too little time to build new border and road infrastructure to reduce congestion at the Dover-Calais crossing and on the M20 motorway in Kent.” That raises the stakes for companies like the operator of the Channel Tunnel, which said Tuesday that a “no-deal” Brexit was now the main scenario in its earnings forecasts. In his pitch to become prime minister, Johnson said he wants a deal but that he would make sure Britain leaves the bloc on Oct. 31, the revised Brexit date after the initial March 29 deadline was extended following the British Parliament’s rejection of Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement. That dealt with citizens’ rights, Britain’s financial obligations to the EU following 46 years of membership and making sure no hard border emerges between EU member Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K. The EU has said a deal is a pre-requisite before discussions can commence on a wide-ranging trade pact. With parliament seemingly opposed to “no-deal,” many Brexiters have promoted the idea that Johnson suspend parliament so Brexit just happens. The implications of such a move would be unpredictable. It could lead to civil unrest and a surge in Scottish nationalism, in addition to the instant economic hit. Johnson has said he doesn’t want to go down that path but hasn’t ruled it out. Given these uncertainties, business executives are unsure how to plan and have reined in investment over the past two years. That’s one of the main reasons why Britain’s economy has stuttered and talk of a recession has grown. “With economic growth already faltering, a disorderly ‘no-deal’ Brexit could cause widespread disruption to trade, a sharply lower exchange rate, higher inflation and lower living standards,” said Arno Hantzsche and Garry Young of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. Most forecasters concur with that analysis so it would be a big step for Johnson to back such a move, without a mandate — in the Brexit referendum of June 2016, talk of a “no-deal” Brexit was confined to the periphery of the Leave campaign. Johnson could therefore push for a general election in the fall after what many expect to be a failed attempt at renegotiating May’s withdrawal agreement. With opinion polls showing Britain’s electorate split across multiple parties, all bets are off on the outcome and whether any incoming government backs another referendum to reverse the initial result. Johnson could equally opt to ditch his “do-or-die” pledge with regard to an Oct. 31 Brexit and seek another extension, giving him time to put a crowd-pleasing tax-cutting budget in place for an election next year. Whatever happens — and given this is Brexit, anything can and probably will — the British economy is set to remain stuck in the mud for months to come. Whether it sinks will hinge on the decisions Johnson makes in his first weeks in power. ___ Follow AP’s full coverage of Brexit at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit'