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Teaching kids and teens self defense to help keep them safe

Kids McKinnon BroadcastingMcKinnon Broadcasting

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) –  With kids out and about during summer break safety is always a concern. Founder of Play It Safe, Tracie Arlington joined KUSI to talk about keeping kids safe this summer with key words and moves to avoid confrontation.  
'SAN DIEGO (KUSI) –  With kids out and about during summer break safety is always a concern. Founder of Play It Safe, Tracie Arlington joined KUSI to talk about keeping kids safe this summer with key words and moves to avoid confrontation.  \t \t\t\t\t Categories : Local San Diego News'

Kids With Wide Ranging Backgrounds Take Part In Camp With Culinary Curriculum

Kids CBS Denver

Children recently arriving in the U.S. get the chance to learn more about their new home and spend time with other kids their age thanks to a summer camp organized by the International Rescue Committee and the YMCA.
'DENVER (CBS4) – Children recently arriving in the U.S. get the chance to learn more about their new home and spend time with other kids their age thanks to a summer camp organized by the International Rescue Committee and the YMCA. (credit: CBS) “I think it’s important because you’re learning how to cook,” said Almajd Hajdaen, 11. “I usually watch my mom cook and I really like it.” Hajdaen is orginally from Syria. She arrived in Colorado a couple years ago. While at the camp on Monday, she spent time in the classroom and in the garden. Part of the curriculum was created by Slow Food Denver to help students think creatively about cooking and take control of what they can make and eat. The organization is one of the partners that helps to support the camp. “The kids that we helped bring to the program are refugee, immigrant and asylees,” said Amber Baack, youth program coordinator for the the International Rescue Committe in Denver. “They’re from all over the world, primarily represented are Syrian children, Iraqi, Afghani and Congolese.” (credit: CBS) The IRC and the YMCA of Metro Denver created this camp to help the children from all around the world interact with other students who are from Colorado. For some of the camp members coming from regions of conflict, the series of activities and classes with others their age help them build a sense of community. “A lot of the youth, especially the refugee kids we’re working with, haven’t had a normal camp or a regular summer,” Baack said. Students made dishes in the classroom using ingredients from Colorado and then spent time outside planting seeds. They also studied the vegetables they’ve worked with in the camp and examined how they grow in the garden. (credit: CBS) “Gardening can help you have more food, you plant seeds and you get food out of what you planted,” Hajdaen said. TOGETHER 4 COLORADO: Latest Stories | Watch ‘Together With Karen Leigh’ | Share A Together 4 Colorado Story Idea With CBS4 Hajdaen shared that the lessons she has learned are built around honesty, caring, responsiblity and respect. The camp teaches these core values and goes beyond the kitchen and garden — students also participate in exercise activities, too. As a junior counselor, she has helped the younger students to complete activities and grown from that experience. “We should follow those rules to be successful in life,” she said. “I’ve learned to be like patient with them.” (credit: CBS) Staff say mixing the two groups of students has worked well. The children do not seem to notice their different backgrounds and create new friendships from the experience. In some cases, the children from other countries arrived three years ago and have had time to adjust to their new country. But others have only been in the U.S. for a few months and the camp plays a significant role in their transition. “It’s been so much fun,” “I would love to be here every single year. LINKS: rescue.org/united-states/denver-co | denverymca.org | slowfooddenver.org'

Mom Notices Daughter Is ‘The Different One’ At Mommy And Me Class Only To Learn it’s Alzheimer’s

Kids LittleThings

Sara McGlocklin knew something just wasn’t right with her six-month-old daughter, Marian.Her bubbly and energetic little girl was struggling to swallow.Then one day, Sara brought Marian to a Mommy and Me class and noticed Marian just wasn’t
'Sara McGlocklin knew something just wasn’t right with her six-month-old daughter, Marian.Her bubbly and energetic little girl was struggling to swallow.Then one day, Sara brought Marian to a Mommy and Me class and noticed Marian just wasn’t exhibiting the same behavior as the other kids.For example, she couldn’t hold her head up like the other babies did.She told her pediatrician who urged her to visit more specialists.By 18 months, Marian was beginning to lose what little amount of memory she had.She couldn’t even take a step or stand up without having to hold onto something.An ultrasound confirmed the most concerning symptom of all: Doctors discovered Marian had an enlarged spleen and liver, which signified a dangerous lipid storage disorder.Marian was diagnosed with Niemann-Pick Type C, a rare genetic condition that can be fatal and of which there is no cure.It affects only one in 150,000 children.Today, Marian looks like a happy and healthy 2-year-old despite her uphill battle.She is one of the youngest people with NPC and the youngest child in the country to participate in a clinical trial and undergo specialized experimental treatment during which she is put under anesthesia and receives medication through her spine.Perhaps the most shocking aspect of NPH is the fact that this heartbreaking disease has a common nickname: childhood Alzheimer’s. . The post Mom Notices Daughter Is ‘The Different One’ At Mommy And Me Class Only To Learn it’s Alzheimer’s appeared first on LittleThings .'

Facebook fails to keep Messenger Kids’ safety promise

Kids TechCrunch

Facebook’s messaging app for under 13s, Messenger Kids — which launched two years ago pledging a “private” chat space for kids to talk with contacts specifically approved by their parents — has run into an embarrassing safety issue. The Verge
'Facebook’s messaging app for under 13s, Messenger Kids — which launched two years ago pledging a “private” chat space for kids to talk with contacts specifically approved by their parents — has run into an embarrassing safety issue. The Verge obtained messages sent by Facebook to an unknown number of parents of users of the app informing them the company had found what it couches as “a technical error” which allowed a friend of a child to create a group chat with them in the app which invited one or more of the second child’s parent-approved friends — i.e. without those secondary contacts having been approved by the parent of the first child. Facebook did not make a public disclosure of the safety issue. We’ve reached out to the company with questions. It earlier confirmed the bug to the Verge, telling it: “We recently notified some parents of Messenger Kids account users about a technical error that we detected affecting a small number of group chats. We turned off the affected chats and provided parents with additional resources on Messenger Kids and online safety.” The issue appears to have arisen as a result of how Messenger Kids’ permissions are applied in group chat scenarios — where the multi-user chats apparently override the system of required parental approval for contacts who kids are chatting with one on one. But given the app’s support for group messaging it’s pretty incredible that Facebook engineers failed to robustly enforce an additional layer of checks for friends of friends to avoid unapproved users (who could include adults) from being able to connect and chat with children. The Verge reports that “thousands” of children were left in chats with unauthorized users as a result of the flaw. Despite its long history of playing fast and loose with user privacy, at the launch of Messenger Kids in 2017 the then head of Facebook Messenger, David Marcus, was quick to throw shade at other apps kids might use to chat — saying: “In other apps, they can contact anyone they want or be contacted by anyone.” Turns out Facebook’s Messenger Kids has also allowed unapproved users into chatrooms it claimed as safe spaces for kids, saying too that it had developed the app in “lockstep” with the FTC. We’ve reached out to the FTC to ask if it will be investigating the safety breach. Friends’ data has been something of a recurring privacy blackhole for Facebook — enabling, for example, the misuse of millions of users’ personal information without their knowledge or consent as a result of the expansive permissions Facebook wrapped around it, when the now defunct political data company, Cambridge Analytica, paid a developer to harvest Facebook data to build psychographic profiles of US voters . The company is reportedly on the verge of being issued with a $5BN penalty by the FTC related to an investigation of whether it breached earlier privacy commitments made to the regulator. Various data protection laws govern apps that process children’s data, including the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (Coppa) in the US and the General Data Protection Regulation in Europe. But while there are potential privacy issues here with the Messenger Kids flaw, given children’s data may have been shared with unauthorized third parties as a result of the “error”, the main issue of concern for parents is likely the safety risk of their children being exposed to people they have not authorized in an unsupervised video chat environment. On that issue current laws have less of a support framework to offer. Although — in Europe — rising concern about a range of risks and harms kids can face when going online has led the UK government to seek to regulate the area. recently published white paper sets out its plan to regulate a broad range of online harms , including proposing a mandatory duty of care on platforms to take reasonable steps to protect users from a range of harms, such as child sexual exploitation.'

Flaw in Facebook’s Messenger Kids let kids invite a parent-approved user into a group chat even if that user wasn’t authorized to chat with others in the group (Russell Brandom/The Verge)

Kids USA News Hub

The Partner’s guide to marketing on LinkedIn  —  What is LinkedIn® really?  —  It’s a question that keeps popping up from time to time, is it a social media site for professionals?  —  Is it a platform for job seekers and recruiters to meet?
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Parents: Here’s How to Break Out of Your Boring Daily Routine

Kids Fatherly

Because giving your kids happy parents is one of the most generous things you can do.
'Being a parent can sometimes feel like playing the same level of a video game over and over again.You face wave after randomized wave of snack requests, poopy diapers, and fights about toys, a seemingly endless montage of sameness.It’s stressful . It’s boring.It feels like this for a reason. “Children’s needs are pretty constant,” says Eileen Kennedy-Moore , licensed psychologist in Princeton, New Jersey, and author of Kid Confidence . Even with the most solid routines, each day can easily turn into an improv act, where you’re just trying to survive and constantly performing a mental juggling act that offers no sense of calm or completion. “We’re thinking about the next thing we have to be doing or the thing that we’re not doing,” she says.This is true for a lot of parents.What’s needed, then, is a break, a chance to pull back and clear your head.Groundbreaking, right?Yes, the suggestion of time for yourself is not new; the big question is always how do you pull it off?Money, work, and available babysitting are real constraints when it comes to finding time for one’s self.But a large part of it comes from drawing some boundaries with your children to get time apart.Another part of it is an attitude shift, the biggest one being that you don’t want to feel guilty wanting time apart.The desire isn’t selfish or destructive; it’s necessary. “If you’re not rested and at your best, you lose the long game,” says Keith Miller , licensed clinical social worker in Washington, D.C., and creator of Mindfulness & Emotional Fitness . He poses the options like this: “Do you want to be good over time, or great for 10 minutes and be a complete jerk for the rest of the day?” When put that way, it’s not a hard choice.The first thing to do might sound like the anti-remedy, but it’s to spend more time with your kids, but with more intent.As Kennedy-Moore says it’s about adopting a “Be here now,” attitude.This can blunt both the franticness and boredom that comes with playing whatever for the 18th time.It’s not 100 percent effective, but when you commit all-in to whatever is in front of you, being present is more possible. “It makes it more satisfying for you and the kids,” she says.The bigger play is to get some time for yourself and each other.Lesli Doares, a licensed marriage and family therapist and creator of the Hero Husband Project , says some of the fires that parents feel they’re constantly putting out are actually self-inflicted; meals and bedtime being two main culprits.With food, it’s feeling like a short-order cook, trying to satisfy everyone’s palate.With sleeping, it’s falling into the web of “just one more book.” The answer with both is establishing reasonable, consistent routines , and, and, and, sticking with them.For dinner, plan out the week so each night isn’t a scramble, and have the kids suggest a night’s meal, giving them buy-in; if they can be part of the cooking, building self-esteem and kitchen chops, even better, Doares says.For bed, it could be three books, a hug and a kiss.Whatever it is, it’s just known.There will be pushback, with pleading, and big, sad eyes, but that should not shake your resolve. “Our job is to have limits,” Kennedy-Moore says. “Their job is to test them.”  The ultimate intent is to turn the boundaries into time away.The what-to-do could be anything — exercise, poker night, a neighborhood walk just as long as it’s enjoyable.The guilt that you’re not fulfilling your duty of complete self-sacrifice is what gets in the way.Martyrdom, however, benefits no one. “You end up resenting your children and that’s poison in any relationship,” Kennedy-Moore says.Here’s what happens when you get some separation: You get to miss your kids.They get to miss you.You get to recharge and they get that freshened-up version.They also get to be around other voices and are nudged into their own decision-making since you can’t swoop in to fix every situation.Far from breaking, they’ll build resiliency, Kennedy-Moore says.The next step is for parents to reconnect as a couple.One thing that takes no planning is having “ How Was Your Day ?” conversations.The question is basic, direct, and disappears over time in a relationship, but it’s how you find out what’s going on, and it’s a sign of caring. “People like to be asked,” Kennedy-Moore says. “We just know the person better.Intimacy is about knowing the person better.” During couple time, Doares says, just don’t talk about the kids or your relationship.Kennedy-Moore makes it even simpler: Just have fun.You could hire a sitter in order to do Saturday morning errands, if the two of you come home laughing, it works.You don’t even have to leave the house.You could hole up in the bedroom for 30 minutes, with the kids occupied with a show, the door locked, and the warning that unless there’s blood or fire involved, you are not to be disturbed.It’s another boundary, and another one they’ll eventually accept, Doares says.Kennedy-Moore adds that small and consistent plans, rather than the occasional big event, are likely the better option.They’re more doable and provide something to look forward to.Plus, their regularity tamps down expectations.All of this is difficult.The push to make these plans happen is moderate at best.Time alone doesn’t generate income or, say, build foreign language skills in a first grader.It’s easy, then, to push it aside and never revisit, because it feels too selfish and non-essential. “It isn’t,” Kennedy-Moore says. “Giving your kids happy parents is one of the most generous things you can do.”  Related Articles: Fatherly Finds: Meet Your New Favorite Rocking Camping Chair Going to Summer Concerts Is Bad.Sitting Near Summer Concerts Is Great.School Lunch Debt Should Not Exist, Much Less Lead to Foster Care The 12 Best Baby Name Generators on the Internet . The post Parents: Here’s How to Break Out of Your Boring Daily Routine appeared first on Fatherly .'

Chris Harris Jr. Foundation Hands Out Backpacks To Kids At Denver Children’s Home

Kids CBS Denver

Broncos cornerback Chris Harris Jr. is helping make sure kids in the Denver area are ready for the new school year.
'DENVER (CBS4) – Broncos cornerback Chris Harris Jr. is helping make sure kids in the Denver area are ready for the new school year. The Chris Harris Jr. Foundation gave out backpacks fully stocked with school supplies to the kids at the Denver Children’s Home, a facility that offers services for traumatized children and their families. (credit: CBS) This is the second year the foundation has done the backpack giveback. This year, the foundation is expecting to give out over 500 backpacks across the country, including in Harris’s hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma. (credit: CBS) Leah Harris, Harris’s wife, was at Sunday’s event. She said she can relate to the stress of an upcoming school year and is happy to help meet a community need. “Having a lot of kids ourselves, we know that back to school was a really hard time and stressful time for parents,” she said. “They need support, supplies, haircuts, and things like that can really add up. So we really thought that it was a good idea.” (credit: CBS) For more information about the Chris Harris Jr. Foundation, go to chrisharrisjr.com/foundation/ .'

Married with kids: Aging with grace

Kids USA New Updates

(PxHere photo) As a younger woman, I looked around me at the hair dyes that older women were using to colour their greys and decided I would never do such a thing. People should accept the aging process gracefully, I philosophized back then, not try
'(PxHere photo) As a younger woman, I looked around me at the hair dyes that older women were using to colour their greys and decided I would never do such a thing. People should accept the aging process gracefully, I philosophized back then, not try to fight it with hair dyes, wrinkle creams, cosmetic surgery and clothes designed for the young and sexy. The quest to grasp eternal youth seemed a vain attempt to recapture years that had come and gone. How much better it would be to accept a new stage of life with grace, dignity and resignation than attempt to disguise its presence, I thought. Of course, the moment my brunette locks began showing signs of grey, I changed my tune fast. I was too young to go grey, I argued with my inner self as I hit my early 40s. I wasn’t ready to be classified as an old lady, which is what those grey hairs seemed to irrevocably signify. I reached for the hair dyes, root rescues and highlights, and haven’t looked back since. I realize now how difficult it is to release the youthful, carefree spirit of the 20s and 30s and accept the worries and fears that go hand-in-hand with aging. It’s definitely a privilege to age in good health – something not everyone gets to enjoy. Why complain about sore backs, grey hair, flabby arms and wrinkled skin when others are dealing with cancer diagnoses? “I’m a breast cancer survivor,” a new friend confessed in my kitchen recently, as we sliced veggies for crudités. My jaw dropped as she launched into an explanation of the treatment and surgery that had changed her life in recent months. Down the road, another friend who just turned 50 was celebrating a new lease on life after a year of numbing chemotherapy and radiation. “Life isn’t for sissies,” my aunt whispered as she confessed her own series of ailments, grateful to be celebrating milestones with her family rather than six feet under. Closer to 50 now than 40, I’m acutely aware of how lucky I am to be strong and healthy. But when I catch my reflection in the mirror, I’m consistently stunned. There must be a mistake, I think to myself. The person I expect to see is 32 because that’s how I feel. The one who looks back at me is clearly 47. I see new moms in bright summer dresses walking babies in strollers and am shocked at how young they look. That was me just the other day, my mind insists. And yet, the facts stare back at me, insisting otherwise. My oldest baby is now 19. The new mom days are far behind me. Still, the years have added wisdom and experience to my life portfolio, something those slender new moms have not yet acquired. I have wrestled with the grief that comes with losing one parent to cancer and am watching bravely as another declines into the abyss of dementia, while trying my utmost to maintain his quality of life. On good days, I realize I’ve grown adept at managing a household. The birthday cards I receive from my children suggest I’ve done a decent job of raising a family. READ: MARRIED WITH KIDS: COMING HOME A CHANGED MAN I’m fit as a fiddle and confident enough to take on new challenges, no longer second-guessing my ability to succeed. I’ve earned my laugh lines and wrinkles with courage and stamina. I pray that these attributes will help me survive the years ahead, though I know for sure that whatever’s coming will challenge my limits. I’m in the afternoon of my life, a period in which my presence attracts no wolf whistles, no lingering gazes of appreciation like it once did. I’d be lying if I claimed not to miss the attention. Still, I’m determined to enter this stage of my life with humility, grace, pride – and hair dye. I’m still far from ready to embrace the grey.'