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Kristen Bell's Daughters Tried to Guess Her Age on Her Birthday & the Results Are Hilarious

Space SheKnows

We’re in stitches laughing over this. Kristen Bell’s daughters tried to guess her age on her birthday, and the result is so funny. The Veronica Mars actress turns 39 today (July 18), and when posed the question, “How old do you think I’m turning” to
'We’re in stitches laughing over this. Kristen Bell ’s daughters tried to guess her age on her birthday, and the result is so funny. The Veronica Mars actress turns 39 today (July 18), and when posed the question, “How old do you think I’m turning” to her daughters, the answers were a bit off. (OK — a lot off.) Bell’s two daughters Lincoln, 6, and Delta, 4, did their best in the video, which Bell posted to Instagram. The actress, who shares the sweet girls with husband Dax Shepard, recently got candid about her children and how she rebooted Veronica Mars for them. Since her days of solving mysteries in Neptune, Bell has gone on to star in a slew of comedies and received a Golden Globe nomination for her work on NBC’s The Good Place . But some of Bell’s most entertaining projects have been capturing her daughters’ silliness. View this post on Instagram My kids are kind. I dont care if they cant do math 👵👵👵 (For my #armcherries : #fastmath is overrated.) A post shared by kristen bell (@kristenanniebell) on Jul 17, 2019 at 7:05pm PDT In a video posted on Wednesday, the Frozen actress prompted the question to her girls and awaited their answer answer. Delta, Bell and Shepard’s youngest, chimed in with her guess: “63.” The actress then turned the question over to her eldest daughter, Lincoln, who offered her answer: “89.” When Bell turned the question over to her husband, Shepard can be heard responding, “I’m going to say it’s somewhere in the middle of those two guesses, so 71,” the actor guessed. “Is that right?” Well, no not exactly. One of Bell’s daughters then swapped her answer to “12.” Closer, but not right either. Before Bell revealed she was turning 39 today, July 18. “My kids are kind,” Bell captioned the funny footage. “I don’t care if they can’t do math.” We can’t wait for more videos like these from Bell and her sweet fam.'

Watch: SpaceX’s Starhopper Prototype Goes Up in Flames During Static-Fire Test

Space Geek.com

SpaceX's Starhopper spacecraft burst into flames during a static-fire test on July 16. (Photo Credit: Everyday Astronaut / YouTube) SpaceX’s Starhopper, a prototype for the company’s Mars-bound Starship vehicle, burst into flames
'SpaceX's Starhopper spacecraft burst into flames during a static-fire test on July 16. (Photo Credit: Everyday Astronaut / YouTube) \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t SpaceX’s Starhopper , a prototype for the company’s Mars-bound Starship vehicle, burst into flames during a static-fire test on July 16. Late Tuesday night, SpaceX conducted a static-fire test for the Starhopper at its Texas-based facility, Space.com reported . The company, which administers engine firings before spacecraft launches, is planning a test flight for the vehicle soon. However, the test, which lasted about five seconds, showed orange flames surrounding the Starhopper after its single Raptor engine ignited, TechCrunch noted . According to videos posted by SpaceX community members , the static-fire test started and stopped, but there were still flames burning near the bottom part of the engines. A stream of liquid moved toward the Starhopper and then, the prototype appeared to catch fire and glow like a fireball. SpaceX officials are still investigating the cause of the fire at this time. It’s possible that a fuel dump generated lighter-than-air vapors, which might have circled the Starhopper and caused it to go up in flames. Listen up space lovers! 🌔✨ The @SpaceX Starhopper is expected to launch its prototype today! @elonmusk we want to see that live stream. 🚀 @kgbt #RGV #SpaceX pic.twitter.com/b7oyuoYOHP — Clara Benitez CBS 4 (@ClaraB_KGBT) July 16, 2019 Tuesday’s “fireball” test follows SpaceX’s ongoing Starhopper preparations, which include having the prototype take its first untethered test flight soon . It’s likely that the unleashed hover test will be delayed until SpaceX officials check on the Starhopper’s condition after the random fire. More on Geek.com: SpaceX’s Starhopper Spacecraft Is Ready for a Major Hover Test SpaceX: Leaky Valve Culprit in April Crew Dragon Explosion Watch: SpaceX Is Launching a Falcon Heavy Rocket Tonight'

Apollo 11’s greatest contribution to humanity: infinite inspiration

Space SpaceNews.com

Just as we have built on the foundation provided by the Apollo astronauts, the next generation will build on our achievements, and future generations on theirs. SpaceNews.com
'Of all the major milestones in the continuum of human advancement — mastering fire, inventing the wheel, discovering electricity, harnessing atomic energy, creating the Internet — another that comes to the top of list happened nearly 50 years ago, when astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped down from the Apollo 11 Lunar Module and placed his heavily booted foot on the surface of the Moon. The culmination of almost a decade of fierce effort by some of America’s greatest scientific minds, the moon landing fulfilled President John F. Kennedy’s ambitious goal for the nation and inspired generations to re-think what’s possible. “We choose to go to the Moon and do other things,” President Kennedy announced in 1961, “not because they are easy, but because they are hard . . .” President Kennedy understood that the American spirit responds to challenge with vitality, ingenuity and optimism— qualities that fueled America’s space program from the start and continue to drive it forward today. Even though I was only a toddler on July 20, 1969, I feel a great affinity with the men and women who made the vision a reality, some of whom were my colleagues at Collins Aerospace and its predecessors. These employees were responsible for three systems on the mission: The Apollo space suit life support system, which pressurized the suit, provided oxygen, removed carbon dioxide, provided cooling and controlled humidity. The Lunar Module’s environmental control system, providing a life-sustaining atmosphere onboard the spacecraft. The vital communications link between the astronauts and the Earth, ensuring Neil Armstrong’s first steps and now-famous words—“That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind”—were clearly captured, beamed back to Earth and broadcast around the world. Failure of any one of these systems would have been disastrous to the mission and devastating to the U.S. space program and these people knew it. No pressure, right? All this at a time when “computing” meant get out your paper, pencil and slide rule. Imagine their elation when everything worked flawlessly. They nailed it, as did thousands of others who contributed to the mission, inspiring future generations to continue the journey of space exploration. I was one of the inspired. Growing up, I was captivated by the space shuttle program and the idea that a vehicle could take off, fly into space, then come back, land on Earth like an aircraft, and be re-used. I was fascinated by what it would take to design and build something like that and by the people who could fly and operate it. Even though my dream of being an astronaut wasn’t realized, I continued to pursue a career in aerospace engineering, hoping to become part of the magic of space. To me, the allure of a career in space was two-fold: First, simple curiosity—I wanted to learn as much as I could about the universe, our solar system, and the Earth’s place in it; and, second, I was drawn to the challenge of the complexity of the problems that need to be solved in space. As part of the Collins Aerospace team, I got my wish—and then some. We are constantly learning and solving problems in the space environment every day, from helping to maintain the International Space Station to protecting astronauts to keeping satellites in orbit. And because everything about space is new and different and difficult, our work drives innovation and technology advancement. Now, with NASA’s charge to return to the Moon by 2024 under the Artemis program (Artemis was the twin sister of Apollo in Greek mythology), we have another set of exciting challenges ahead. The plan calls not just for revisiting the Moon—this time at the south pole and with a female astronaut—but also establishing a permanent presence there, from which we can set our sights on the ultimate goal: sending humans to Mars. Talk about a giant leap! We have just over four years to invent, reinvent or refine space transportation, habitation modules, exploration vehicles, life support systems, spacesuits, even the food astronauts will eat. We have made great progress on all these vital components of the journey, but there is much more work to be done to ensure the safety of the astronauts and the success of the mission. While it’s exhilarating to be part of all this, what inspires and excites me even more is envisioning what my children and grandchildren will see and experience in their lifetimes. Will they see the first humans reach Mars? Will they learn if life exists beyond Earth? Will they come to understand other mysteries of the universe? Will they vacation at a lunar outpost? I hope so! Phil Jasper is president of Collins Aerospace Mission Systems. Just as we have built on the foundation provided by the Apollo astronauts, the next generation will build on our achievements, and future generations on theirs. The forward momentum set in motion by those first, fearless space pioneers will build upon itself, continuously adding to our knowledge and understanding of the vast final frontier. Hundreds of years from now, when humans are living on the Moon and Mars and any other habitable place in our solar system, they will look back in awe at the people who took those first steps into a world beyond Earth. And be just as inspired as we are. Thank you, Apollo 11, and happy 50 th anniversary. SpaceNews.com'

ISRO’s Chandrayaan-2 Moon lander mission launch reset for July 22

Space TechCrunch

The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) was all set to launch its Chandrayaan-2 mission to deliver a rover to the Moon’s South Pole last week, but a “technical snag” observed during the last hour of launch prep put a hold on those plans. Now,
'The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) was all set to launch its Chandrayaan-2 mission to deliver a rover to the Moon’s South Pole last week, but a “technical snag” observed during the last hour of launch prep put a hold on those plans . Now, ISRO has officially set a new date for the launch: Monday, July 22, 2019 at 2:43 PM IST (5:13 AM EST). Chandrayaan-2 will aim to deliver a lunar orbiter to the Moon, which will have a lunar lander and rover on board. It’ll be the first attempt by any space agency to soft land a rover at the Moon’s South Pole, as well as India’s first attempt at this kind of soft decent, where a lander attempts to control its path the moon’s surface and touch down gently, instead of an orbiter essentially just firing an impact-shielded vessel at the surface with research equipment on board. India will become only the fourth country to have managed this kind of Moon landing, if the mission is successful. We’ll provide a live stream closer to the launch date, and it should be quite the sight to see when the GSLV Mk-III rocket carrying the Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft makes its way to orbit.'

Op-ed | Why we’re not on the moon now (and how we can stay next time we go)

Space SpaceNews.com

As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first humans to walk on the moon, you might notice we aren’t celebrating it on the moon. Why? SpaceNews.com
'This op-ed originally appeared in the July 16, 2019 special Apollo 11 at 50 issue of SpaceNews magazine. As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first humans to walk on the moon, you might notice we aren’t celebrating it on the moon. Why? Having achieved the greatest feat in human history, why is all we have to show for it flags, footprints and footage? 50 years after the Wright Brothers, anyone could buy a ticket to fly around the world. 50 years after Henry Ford’s first Model T, regular people around the world were driving their own cars. 50 years after Apollo, we’ve got a few government employees orbiting around this world and no one flying to the moon, let alone any of us. Why? Two simple reasons: Who’s in charge, and their goal. The Wright Brothers were citizen engineers who wanted to open the sky so the people could fly. And they did. Ford was a businessman who wanted to give people the freedom to travel. And he did. The U.S. government wanted to beat the Russians to the moon. And it did. It’s that simple. NASA achieved its goal – but it wasn’t opening the moon or the Solar System to the people, no; the goal was just to get that amazing propaganda shot on the TV for all to see. We won! We won! Look at us! We won! And…we’re done. The reason there is no one on the moon and Mars today to celebrate Neil and Buzz taking those small steps is because the goal of the Apollo program was to create a historic moment, not to change the course of history. And while it did both to some degree, imagine if, instead, the goal of that heroic effort had been to open the Solar System to the people of Earth. Who knows where we’d be today and how many of us would be somewhere out there, far from Earth? Word is that we are going back to the moon (again). This time we have two groups leading the way – NASA and the private sector. And while both say their goal is “to stay,” in actuality, they have different reasons. NASA is going because the current administration wants to say they took us back to the moon. Thus the 2024 deadline, which happens to be the end of what might be this president’s second term if he wins the upcoming 2020 election. Some NASA supporters would also like the agency to practice its Mars exploration skills on a planetary surface close to home. The private sector is going because it wants to expand humanity into the Solar System, thereby developing new markets, and new economic opportunities. Thus, while the timeframe matters, planting a flag is not relevant. While Musk also wants to go on to Mars, Bezos and others such as myself see the moon not just as a place to practice exploration, but to learn how to harvest resources, develop industries and build communities. Whatever the political motivations, NASA’s marching orders are to get back to the moon by 2024. Meanwhile, those of us working to open the frontier permanently are driven by basic economics and market forces to move as quickly and efficiently as possible, so returning sooner is better than later. We can all win. To return to the moon quickly, efficiently, and in a way that both establishes a sustainable and growing human community, while supporting Solar System exploration we must first do these things: Agree on the end goal. This cannot be a sprint to plant the flag in the name of one administration. Rather it must be a long-term, economically viable plan to lay the foundation for the development and settlement of space by the people. Break up the work based on who does what best. NASA and its partners should support advanced research and scientific exploration and leave industrial work to the private sector. Put the money where it supports the goal. If we are to move quickly yet sustainably, NASA will have to stop wasting billions in taxpayer funds on archaic one-shot rockets and focus even more of its budget toward the proven programs that support small businesses and economic growth. The role of the government in transportation should be as it is in other sectors – to invest in and support the companies who are also investing their own money and expertise into reusable, efficient, long-ter m, mass transportation and industrial development. I was a child when we went to the moon the first time. I want my child to have the chance to go there herself. In fact, I want her and the children of Earth to be able to live there or anyplace else in the Solar System she chooses. This is a far better legacy than giving her a memory of what we once did but can’t do anymore. It’s time to return to the moon, and this time, We Stay. Rick Tumlinson is the co-founder of the Space Frontier Foundation, Deep Space Industries and Orbital Outfitters, and founder of the EarthLight Foundation and New Worlds Institute. SpaceNews.com'

The Apollo 11 Moon Landing Wasn’t Fake. ‘Moonshot’ Teaches Kids the Truth.

Space Fatherly

Brian Floca, the author of 'Moonshot' reveals why kids love the moon landing, plus that one time a kid said he made the whole thing up.
'This weekend, parents around the world will (hopefully) be telling their kids about that one small step for humankind taken on the surface of the moon exactly five decades ago.On July 20, 1969, astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first two human beings ever to walk in the soil of a place that’s not the planet Earth.But the ingenuity required to get them to that space sandbox took the combined efforts of thousands of scientists and engineers, all working together to achieve a nearly impossible dream.If you’re looking for something to make your kids proud of American history, the Apollo 11 moon landing is a good place to start.But, for some kids, this chapter of history might scan as so fantastic as to seem unreal today.Do kids today believe the moon landing was fake?The answer is complicated, and to dive deeper into the subject of how kids connect with the historic moon landing,   Fatherly caught up with author and illustrator Brian Floca.In 2009, Floca’s beautiful and award-winning picture book  Moonshot became the definitive gateway to introducing grade-schoolers to the wonder and beauty of space travel history.Now, 10 years later, for the 50th anniversary,  Moonshot is out in a brand-new edition with a little bit of new material.Ahead of the historic anniversary, Floca sat down with me to chat about how the book came to be, why kids love the moon, and that one time at least one kid accused him of making the whole thing up.What do you think the moon landing means for kids today?It’s hard to boil it down to just one thing!There’s the grand spectacle, the great machines, the fire, the smoke, the noise, the speed!There’s the bravery of the astronauts, and the industriousness and genius of the builders and planners—making the story of Apollo a story of individual heroism and of teamwork, both, each made possible by the other.It’s a story of leaving home, and returning, changed—a story of that consciousness-altering view of the Earth floating in space.All those strands are there in Apollo, woven together, each adding strength to the other.How is that different from what it means for their parents?It’s an interesting question and you know, I’m not so sure it is very different.Put all those elements together and I think you end up with a sense of wonder and awe that has the power to move us no matter our age.You told me once that some kids in schools thought that you had invented the moon landing, and named the various spacecraft, etc.Why do you think that is?Does that still happen?Yes!During the question and answer session that followed one school reading I had a student ask how I’d decided to name the space ships Columbia and Eagle!I don’t mean to tell that story at the expense of the student; none of us know everything, least of all when we’re eight.But I was struck by the idea that there’s something in the idea of flying to the moon that would make a student think this was a story an author would want to make up—and of course, authors have indeed been making up stories of going to the moon since long before it was possible, and so for me that elemental aspect of the story of going to the moon was revealed by the question.Related, more direct question: In your experience, do you think kids believe the moon landing happened?How pervasive was that conspiracy theory stuff?I have happily not run into much of that while talking to young readers.Maybe the hunger for conspiracy kicks in a little later.The teenage years?Why is it important to teach kids about historical events with picture books like Moonshot?I love the illustrations and I think I know why this format is ideal for a certain-aged kid, but why do you think it works?What can a storybook communicate to a child that a documentary can’t?I think whether a book or a documentary works better for a kid will depend on book, documentary, and kid, all!But maybe a picture book, more than a documentary, or most documentaries, can try to reach its audience through story, through poetry, through trying to make a reader want to know more about a subject, rather than trying to make a reader feel he or she has been told everything about a subject, and there’s a certain power there.I know it’s been a bit since you wrote and illustrated Moonshot, but what was the hardest part about it?The book required a lot of research, and then a lot of discipline in thinking about the best way to use that research.From start to finish it was a sort of running attempt at balancing what needed to be known, shown, and explained, and what could and should be left out because it wouldn’t interest readers or wouldn’t work on behalf of the overall book.There’s that classic line you sometimes see attributed to Orwell about the need to edit ruthlessly while writing: “Murder your darlings.” And when you love your subject matter, you do end up with a lot of darlings!But knowing which ones to keep and which ones to let go is the difference between writing a list and writing a book, and you have to keep reminding yourself very few people want to read a list.The 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing is this Saturday, July 20, 2019.You can grab Brian Floca’s  Moonshot — perfect for grade-schoolers or toddlers who love beautiful illustrations of spaceships — right here.Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 (Richard Jackson Books (Atheneum Hardcover)) Buy Now $12.42   Related Articles: Wondering How to Sleep Better?Get Separate Beds.How the First Year of Fatherhood Changed My Marriage, According to 12 Dads This 20-Minute HIIT Workout Hits Every Muscle Group Viral Single Dad Has Become the Internet's Hottest Bachelor . The post The Apollo 11 Moon Landing Wasn’t Fake. ‘Moonshot’ Teaches Kids the Truth. appeared first on Fatherly .'

Draper developing technologies for lunar landings

Space SpaceNews.com

A half-century after developing the computers that guided the Apollo missions to the moon, Draper is working on technologies that it says can enable new human and robotic missions to the moon in the near future. SpaceNews.com
'CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A half-century after developing the computers that guided the Apollo missions to the moon, Draper is working on technologies that it says can enable new human and robotic missions to the moon in the near future. In the 1960s, the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory had a NASA contract to develop the Apollo Guidance Computer, one of the first portable digital computers. It was used on the command and lunar modules and helped make possible the six successful lunar landings from 1969 through 1972. The lab, later spun out as an independent non-profit called Draper, is involved in several ways in NASA’s new plans to return humans to the moon by 2024, leveraging that heritage along with new technologies to enable new mission to the moon. “While we recognize and celebrate what happened 50 years ago, that’s not the point,” said Ken Gabriel, president and chief executive of Draper, at a media tour of the lab July 8. “The point is, what are we going to do in the next 50 years?” Draper is already involved with elements of NASA’s exploration programs. Seamus Tuohy, principal director of space systems at Draper, said the lab is providing fault-tolerant computers and software for the Space Launch System, and guidance, navigation and control software for the Orion spacecraft. Draper is among the nine companies and organizations that received awards from NASA last November for the Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program. Draper was not selected, though, for the first round of flight contracts in May, with the agency instead selecting landers from Astrobotic, Intuitive Machines and OrbitBeyond . Tuohy said NASA made those initial awards based on price. “There was a whole group of people under $100 million, and a whole group of people over $100 million. The three that were under $100 million won,” he said. Draper plans to pursue additional CLPS opportunities, with the next competition expected in by early fall. “We’re looking forward to bidding the next time. We’re not discouraged at all,” he said, adding the company didn’t plan to make major changes in its design. Draper is partnered with ispace, a Japanese company developing commercial lunar landers. For the CLPS program, which requires landers to be manufactured in the United States, General Atomics will build the landers based on the ispace design. The commercial interest in the landers comes from several sources, Tuohy said. Some want to demonstrate technologies on those missions, while others are interested in studying potential resources on the moon. There are, in addition, government agencies outside the United States interested in flying payloads on those landers for science. “All of those avenues are being explored by ispace,” he said. Draper is also looking at technologies like vision-aided inertial navigation that could be used on future human lunar landers. That includes the ability to do autonomous landings that could enable exploration of areas that couldn’t otherwise be accessed, particularly at the lunar poles. “There are locations at that portion of the moon that have never seen sunlight,” Tuohy said. “We may potentially be landing in shadow, so you need more technologies than the human eye to do that.” Those technologies would be ready to support a 2024 landing, he said. “We didn’t just start thinking about this last year,” he said, with some of that work dating back 15 years. “We think we have matured the technology needed to do autonomous, but safe and routine, landings on the moon by 2024.” “Aggressive schedules don’t scare us,” Gabriel said. The bigger concern, he noted, is goals that shift. “One of the things that was powerful about the Apollo missions was that President Kennedy laid out a very specific, simple objective: man on the moon by the end of the decade. There was a lot of detail, a lot of work, a lot of unknowns, but the objective was never in question.” Gabriel recalled what the lab’s founder, Charles Stark “Doc” Draper, said in the 1960s when NASA asked him when he would have the Apollo Guidance Computer ready: “He said, ‘When you need it.’” SpaceNews.com'

Behind the tragedies that helped Apollo 11 succeed

Space New York Post

The success of Apollo 11 was lauded as one of man’s greatest achievements and sparked a historic surge of support for space exploration that is being revived in modern times. But behind the headlines and an international victory tour were several
'The success of Apollo 11 was lauded as one of man’s greatest achievements and sparked a historic surge of support for space exploration that is being revived in modern times. But behind the headlines and an international victory tour were several devastating personal tragedies that have been partially credited with driving the mission. The first..'

Meet John Houbolt: He Figured Out How To Go To The Moon, But Few Were Listening

Space NPR

In the early 1960s, NASA was considering three different ideas for landing a man on the lunar surface. Houbolt's plan ultimately won out despite concerns within NASA that it was too risky.
'In the early 1960s, NASA was considering three different ideas for landing a man on the lunar surface. Houbolt's plan ultimately won out despite concerns within NASA that it was too risky. (Image credit: NASA/LARC/Bob Nye/PhotoQuest/Getty Images)'